Ironstone Place

Ironstone-Place-Exterior-14_Lurie-Building-Design
_BRIEF
_BRIEF

Ironstone Place presented a compelling opportunity to design a new, low-maintenance home for a middle-aged couple on a sloping rural property. The design brief sought to capture the essence of the Australian bush – it’s rugged, natural charm – while aligning with the clients’ minimalist lifestyle and the practicalities of rural living.

The brief called for two bedrooms, two bathrooms, and an open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area. Additionally, a self-contained studio beneath the main roof was to offer a versatile space for guests, extended family, or potential rental income, further enhancing the home’s functionality and adaptability. 

The clients desired a raw, textured aesthetic for the interior, minimising the use of plasterboard. Externally, the design needed to meet BAL-29 bushfire safety standards. The primary goal was to foster a strong connection and flow between the indoor and outdoor spaces, and with the surrounding natural environment.

_OUTCOME
_OUTCOME

Secluded at the end of a bitumen driveway, Ironstone Place is embraced by Marri trees to the south and Peppermint trees fringing a winter creek to the north. A large elevated terrace extends from the home, connecting it to the forest canopy and offering panoramic views deep into the bush. The gabled roof form and corrugated steel cladding recall the area’s agricultural heritage.

The home has two entrances: a formal entrance welcomes guests to the primary residence, while a casual breezeway directs occupants via an open-air mudroom, laundry and bathroom. Three independent living and work zones reside under a single roof, linked by semi-enclosed passages. This flexible layout allows the home to adapt to changing circumstances, comfortably accommodating a large family or a couple with guests or tenants.

The solar-passive design maximises thermal performance by facing north, resulting in generously proportioned, uncluttered, and light-filled interiors. Raw, tactile, and durable materials – brick, steel, timber, concrete, and glass – define the space and ensure the low-maintenance surfaces meet the demands of rural living. In the main living area, cavity-stacking glazing and the continuous use of timber-lined ceilings and concrete floors blur the transition between inside and out.

The home’s bold lines and meticulous detailing speak to the exacting standards of its owner-builders, a tradesperson, and a dressmaker. It embodies their commitment to practicality, refined craftsmanship, and, ultimately, their enduring connection to the bush.

_PROJECT INFORMATION
_PROJECT INFORMATION
Photographer Olive Lipscombe

_A new name and a new brand to better reflect who we are and where we are headed

MIchael & susan lurie